The American educational system is a massive and complex enterprise – according to the 2000 Census, there were over 75 million students in the United States in 2000, from kindergarten to graduate school.

13.5 million teachers, administrators, and support personnel work to educate those students in public and private institutions, making the education industry the second largest employer in the American workforce.

At all levels of education, professional assessment and evaluation professionals are paid to determine the instructional needs of individual students, instructors, and schools.

For more information on online assessment and evaluation degrees, CLICK HERE.

Assessment and Evaluation Career Outlook

Depending on the strength of your resume and the level of your academic achievement, a degree in assessment and evaluation can qualify you for a rewarding and service-based career as an Instructional Coordinator, an Education Counselor or advisor, or an Education Administrator. Let’s take a look at the career outlook for each occupation:

  • Instructional Coordinators: As educators of all levels strive to improve curriculum and instructional effectiveness, instructional coordinators will experience strong career growth.

    There were 133,900 instructional coordinators in 2008, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The field is expected to add more than 31,000 jobs over a decade, for a 2018 total of 165,000 positions. That’s an expected 23% growth rate, much faster than the average expansion of all careers over the same time period.

    Instructional coordinators are expected to experience strong job growth from 2008 to 2018. Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

    Real job opportunities for instructional coordinators will be even stronger than that robust estimate. According to the Occupational Information Network, there will be 60,600 job openings for instructional coordinators from 2008 to 2018. That figure includes the 31,000 new jobs predicted by the BLS AND existing positions vacated by retirement, career change, promotion, and early termination.

  • Education and Career Counselors and Advisors: According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, there were 275,800 school and occupational counselors in 2008. Career opportunities are expected to be favorable for school counselors as schools grow and post-secondary education becomes more common. They are also expected to be favorable for career counselors, as multiple career changes become more common.

    School and career counselors are expected to add 38,600 new jobs over 10 years, for a 2018 total of 314,400 positions. That's a 14% growth rate, significantly higher than the 8.2% expansion of the civilian workforce expected over the same time period.

    Education and career counselors are expected to experience healthy occupational growth from 2008 to 2018. Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

    Real job opportunities for school and career counselors will be even better than that estimate. According to the Occupational Information Network, a project of the Department of Labor's Employment and Training Administration, there will be 94,400 positions available to qualified substance abuse and behavioral disorder counselors from 2008 to 2018. That figure includes those 38,600 predicted new positions AND positions vacated by retirement, career change, early termination, and promotion.

  • Education Administrators: According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, there were 445,400 working education administrators in 2008. The field is expected to add 37,000 new jobs over 10 years, for a 2018 total of 482,500 positions. That’s an 8% growth rate, about the same as the average growth of all occupations and the predicted expansion of the civilian workforce.

    Education administrators will experience an 8% occupational growth rate from 2008 to 2018, about the same as the 8.2% predicted expansion of the entire civilian workforce over the same time period.Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

    Despite an average growth rate, career prospects for education administrators are good. Education administration is a high-stress career with an aging, well-pensioned workforce; a large number of retirements are expected in the next ten years. According to the Occupational Information Network, a project of the Department of Labor's Employment and Training Administration, there will be over 170,000 positions available to qualified education administrators from 2008 to 2018. That figure includes the BLS'spredicted new jobs, AND existing positions vacated by retirement, career change, promotion, and early termination.

Assessment and Evaluation Earnings

Earnings for graduates of assessment and evaluation programs vary by position, experience, and educational achievement. Beyond annual wages, many education professionals also enjoy generous benefit packages including paid vacation, continuing education stipends, and attractive health and pension packages.

  • Annual earnings for instructional coordinators in 2008 were significantly higher than national median wages, according to the BLS. Median annual wages for instructional coordinators were $56,880, while the middle 50% of the field made between $42,070 and $75,000. The lowest-paid 10% of instructional coordinators earned less than $31,800, while the highest 10% earned more than $93,250.

    Earnings for instructional coordinators are generally excellent, much higher than national median wages. Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics
  • According to the BLS, the annual median wages for school and occupational counselors in 2008 were $51,050. The middle 50% of the field made between $38,740 and $65,360 a year, while the bottom 10% made less than $29,360 and the top 10% made more than $82,330.

    Education and career counselors earned median wages significantly higher than the national median for all occupations in 2008. Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics
  • Earnings for education administrators vary by the educational level of the institution for which they work.

    According to the BLS, preschool and childcare administrators made an annual median of $39,940 in 2008. Elementary and high school administrators averaged $83,880, and post-secondary (college and university) administrators made $80,670.

    Earnings for education administrators varied widely by education level in 2008.Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

Assessment and Evaluation Educational Benefits

A degree in assessment and evaluation generally includes coursework in statistics, quantitative reasoning, psychology and behavioral science, and teaching method and theory.

Unlike other industries in which strong work experience alone can make you a contender for job openings, most professional careers in education require a college degree. Many education professionals are automatically bumped into a higher pay bracket by completing master’s and doctoral work or other national certifications.

  • Instructional coordinators are predictably well-educated. According to the Occupational Information Network, a project of the United States Department of Labor, 79% of instructional coordinators aged 25 to 44 have a bachelors degree or higher; many have master’s or doctoral degrees. Seventeen percent have some college education, including partial completion of a bachelor’s degree or a completed associate’s degree. Only 4% have no formal education beyond a high school diploma.

    Instructional coordinators are generally very highly educated. Source: Occupational Information Network
  • According to the Occupational Information Network, the vast majority – 73% – of professional and education counselors have a bachelor's degree or higher. Only 9% have no formal education beyond a high school diploma, and the remaining 18% have completed some college, including counseling associate's degree programs.

    Educational Achievement Source: Occupational Information Network
  • Seventy-eight percent of education administrators aged 25 to 44 have a bachelor’s degree or higher, according to the Occupational Information Network; many have master’s or doctoral degrees. Fifteen percent have some college, including associate’s degrees or undergraduate certificates. Only 6% have no formal education beyond a high school diploma.

    Education administrators generally have a bachelor’s degree or higher. Source: Occupational Information Network

Assessment and Evaluation Programs Online

Assessment and evaluation degrees are offered online at the master’s and doctoral level.

The best online assessment and evaluation programs provide an education as good as one pursued at a local ground school, in a more flexible and accessible format that may be better suited to working students. As with all expensive and important educational decisions, do your research when choosing an online assessment and evaluation program at any level. Is the school accredited? Do credits transfer? What are people saying about this program specifically and this school in general? The answers to many of these questions can be found on this website, but don't be afraid to ask your admissions counselor difficult questions.

 

See our "How to Choose" section for a more detailed list of things to consider and questions to ask, and use our powerful School Search tool to compare schools that offer assessment and evaluation degrees .

 

Assessment and Evaluation Skills and Abilities

Assessment and evaluation degrees teach students to accurately and quantifiably measure the proficiencies and deficiencies of students, teachers, and instructional programs.

Educational assessment is deeply rooted in quantifiable data. Students with strong math and research skills will have an advantage.

Because assessment and evaluation professionals often work as part of an administrative team, cooperative and leadership skills are valuable.

Assessment and evaluation professionals often use computers to compile, analyze, and graphically represent their findings. Strong computer skills are increasingly expected by prospective employers.

Assessment and Evaluation Qualifications and Advancement

Completion of an assessment and evaluation master’s or doctoral degree can qualify candidates with strong work experience for a wide range of career opportunities in the education industry, including but not limited to Instructional Coordinators, Education and Career Counselors and Advisors, and Education Administrators.

Additional Information

For more information on online assessment and evaluation degrees, CLICK HERE.

The American School Counselors Association maintains a Web site at http://www.schoolcounselor.org.

The Educational Leadership Constituent Council maintains a Web site at http://www.npbea.org/ncate.php.